What Are You Going To Do With That? The Arts and Humanities at Work

Free workshop.  If you’re a student of the arts or humanities and a well-meaning relative has ever asked “what are you going to do with that?” this event is for you. Five panelists working in educational nonprofits, arts advocacy organizations, archives, and bookstores will speak to what it’s like to build a career outside the university that still privileges the ideas and values of the liberal arts. 

Discussion will begin at 4:30. Join us before the panel at 3:30 for a networking reception with our panelists. @ the Writers House 305 Cooper Street   March 8, 2017   3:30 pm-6:00 pm

For more information contact Leah Falk, leah.falk@camden.rutgers.edu

Call for Papers from Essays in History

Essays in History (EiH), the annual peer-reviewed journal of the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History, is currently soliciting articles and book reviews for its fifty-first issue, to appear in the fall of 2017. EiH continues its tradition as a source of high-quality historical work by graduate students and emerging scholars. More information is here. : http://www.essaysinhistory.com/  The deadline for article and book review submissions is April 1, 2017. Article submissions should include a copy of the author’s curriculum vitae and an abstract of roughly one hundred words in length. Authors interested in submitting book reviews should provide a current curriculum vitae and contact the journal prior to their submission in order to confirm the monograph to be reviewed. Submission guidelines are here http://www.essaysinhistory.com/content/submissions
We are also soliciting longer historiographical essays of approximately 4,000-4,500 words that review two or more recent monographs on a common theme.Essays in History can be contacted at essays_in_history@virginia.edu if you have any questions.

Call for Papers

Lenses and Contacts: Framing Early America     McNeil Center Biennial Graduate Student Conference

Philadelphia, 5–7 October 2017

This conference will focus on  established historiographical frameworks and new directions. Papers could address topics including but not limited to: spatial lenses, including Atlantic, continental, global, and local; people, places, and ideas on the margins; histories from above and below; perspectives on race, class, gender, and sexuality in early America; ways of knowing, including religion, environmental, scientific, and medical histories; networks & crossings Graduate students in any relevant discipline are invited to submit proposals, which should include a 250-word prospectus and a one-page curriculum vitae together in one pdf document labeled with the applicant’s last name. Please include your name, your paper title, your institutional affiliation, and your email address at the top of the first page of the proposal. Conference presentations will be limited to twenty minutes. Participants will receive some financial support for travel and lodging expenses. Applicants should e-mail their proposals by 15 March 2017 to mceas@ccat.sas.upenn.edu. Decisions will be announced in late May 2017.

Lees Seminar Schedule Spring 2017

The Graduate History Program at Rutgers-Camden announces its Lees Seminars for 2016-2017, where scholars present cutting-edge research in progress through pre-circulated papers. Seminars open with an author’s introduction and a formal comment, followed by discussion and light refreshments. This series is supported by an endowment gift from Professor Andrew Lees.

Each seminar is followed by snacks and a social hour. Let us know if you plan to come so we can have adequate refreshments. Maps and directions are available on the Rutgers-Camden site.

If you are planning to attend a session, email Professor Nick Kapur (nick.kapur@rutgers.edu) at least one week in advance. Unless otherwise noted, the Lees Seminar is held in the first floor seminar room of 429 Cooper Street.

February 3, 2017 (Friday), 3:00-5:00 p.m.
To Repair Whose Broken Fortune?: Problem Portraits, Snuff Politics, and the Search for the Historical Cosby (Joint Rutgers-Camden/McNeil Center Seminar) WAYNE BODLE, Indiana University of Pennsylvania Location: Faculty Lounge, Third Floor, Armitage Hall

March 10, 2017 (Friday), 4:00-6:00 p.m.“The Whig Party at Prayer: Anglicanism and the Politics of Toleration”
NOAH McCORMACK, Harvard University Commentator: Catherine L. Chou, Postdoctoral Fellow, Villanova University


April 7, 2017 (Friday), 4:00-6:00 p.m.“The Missing Women of the Warrior House in Medieval Japan”
DAVID SPAFFORD, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania
Commentator: Amy Stanley, Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University