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Another Round of Conference Presentations by Our Graduate Students

It has been a busy spring for our graduate students. Mikaela Maria and Matthew White gave a presentation on “Commuters and Communities” about our digital work about the relationship between Camden and Rutgers University Camden at the National Council of Public History meeting in Nashville. Matt White also gave presentations at the ALHFAM meeting entitled “Do You Guys Own Slaves: A Case Study of a High-Minded Living History Event” and a paper at the CUNY EARS conference entitled “‘Mexico…Will Reward All of Our Hopes': the End of the Civil War, Slavery, and Colonization in Mexico.”

Career Opportunity

Hunter Research, Inc. is accepting applications for the position of Historian. Candidates should have a Masters Degree in American History, Architectural History or a related field and up to five years of related experience. Hunter Research is a cultural resources management firm based in downtown Trenton, New Jersey. This position requires exceptional research and writing skills. Responsibilities include research in support of archaeological and historic architectural investigations, the organization and maintenance of in-house research materials, and technical report writing. Familiarity with government agencies, libraries and archives in the Mid-Atlantic and New England states is a plus. Proficiency with deed searches, historic maps and cartographic sources considered essential. Experience with historic architectural survey is desirable but not required. The Historian position is based at the company offices in Trenton with regular weekday work hours. Some local travel will be required for research and field work. Weekend and overnight stays to distant project sites may be required from time to time but are not typical. Flexibility is a plus. Applicants should possess a driver’s license and their own car. Computer proficiency in MS Office is required. Knowledge of ArcGIS, Citation and DeedMapper software is advantageous, as is experience using on-line historic databases and research tools. Applicant should have a basic knowledge of federal and state guidelines and regulations as they apply to cultural resources management. This is a full-time entry-level position, benefits package available. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Minority and women applicants encouraged to apply. Hunter Research is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Send cover letter, resume and writing sample (no more than 10 pages total) to: Attn: Patrick Harshbarger Principal Historian/Architectural Historian Hunter Research, Inc. 120 West State Street Trenton, NJ 08608 pharshbarger@hunterresearch.com (electronic submissions accepted) Deadline for Applications is May 10, 2015

Conference Presentations by Our Graduate Students

Two of our graduate students, Leslie Peck & Lewis Whilden, presented papers at the Barnes Club Conference in Philadelphia this year. Their presentations are described below. Women and Poverty in the Progressive Era: The Story of Sarah and Nellie Tiffany. by Leslie Peck Poverty, and the issues that surround it have long been a part of American political, cultural, and religious discourse. But as theologians, civic leaders, and charity organizers debated about the causes of poverty and what should be done about it women struggled to earn a living, provide for dependent children, and balance culture and gender norms in a society that has often left them unsupported and on the margins. This paper follows the lives of two such women: Sarah and Nellie Tiffany. It follows their stories through newspapers, orphan asylum records, census records, personal correspondence, and family lore. In addition, it places their experiences in the larger context of women’s issues in the early twentieth century. But this is also a family story, and demonstrates that family history can be treated as – history. It also reminds us that old family stories can teach powerful lessons. “Reimagining Communities in the Image of Righteousness: The “Friends of Education” and the Fight for Public Instruction in New Jersey” by Lewis Whilden Inspired by a job imitating a 19th century schoolmaster for children, my Barnes conference presentation explored the early history of the fight for public education in the state of New Jersey. What emerged from the documents was a popular, upper middle class Antebellum activist movement called the “Friends of Education,” who used public meetings and newspapers to compel the New Jersey Assembly to pass a limited law in 1829, “An Act to Establish Common Schools.” Steeped in the language of moral reform and the Second Great Awakening, the Friends sought to remake the world in their own image, showing as much concern for the preponderance of drunken schoolmasters as they did for the illiteracy of the poor. As Jacksonians swept the statehouse in the 1830s, the Friends 1829 law would be repealed, but their actions established a thriving “common school lobby,” whose efforts eventually led to publicly funded instruction for all children in New Jersey.

Internship Opportunity

The all-volunteer Oral History Program of the Battleship New Jersey video records interviews with former crew members, Navy and other military veterans, who talk about their on-board life, duties and perils. We have done over 300 interviews, including veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Beirut crisis, Iraq and Afghanistan. The collection is available to researchers, historians, writers, educators, students, and the public from the Library of Congress and the NJ State Library, including online access. Users can digitally search a database of keyword lists, abstracts, or transcripts. We Need Interns We need help in scheduling, conducting interviews, video and audio recording, video/audio editing, keyword coding of interviews, abstracting, transcribing, indexing, data entry, generation and distribution of recordings, record-keeping, fundraising, etc. If you have experience in any of these areas, great, but it is not necessary, as we provide training. Contact Us Ron Gottardi, Volunteer Director, Oral History Program, Battleship New Jersey, 62 Battleship Place, Camden, NJ 08103; email: oralhistory@battleshipnewjersey.org

Lees Seminars Spring 2015

This is a reminder that our first Lees Seminar this semester will take place on Friday, March 6th at 4pm. Rick Demirjian will present “THE REAL SOURCE OF OUR REVOLUTION”: EARLY NATIONAL COMMERCIAL POLICY AND AMERICA’S SECONDARY PORTS, 1783-1814. Andrew Fagal will serve as commentator. 

Please RSVP by this Friday, Feb. 27th to s.mokhberi@rutgers.edu if you have not already. 
 
UPCOMING SEMINARS:


On Friday, April 3rd at 4pm, Nick Kapur will present; Franz Prichard, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies at Princeton University, will comment.

On Friday May 1 at 3pm, our event, co-sponsored by the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at Penn, will feature David Silverman, Professor of History at George Washington University.